Jacquelyn Brioux
Researcher and Service Experience Designer

About

A little bit about me

 
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I was born and raised in Toronto, Canada and relocated to Alexandria, Virginia (Washington, DC Metro) a few years ago with my wife after DOMA was overturned. I was the first in my family to go to college and I consider myself a lifelong learner, whether through life experience or continued higher education. I've worked as a soccer referee, customer service representative at Blockbuster and HMV, resident assistant (RA), back shop attendant at a private golf course, ESL teacher in South Korea, administrative assistant, graphic designer, barista, shift supervisor at Starbucks, music blogger, composer agent, music licensing agent, cultural policy researcher, communications strategist, user experience designer, and now—a service design lead. Over the years, I've learned how to make an excellent latte and a curated playlist of composer cues for a dramatic series; develop a viral social media marketing campaign and draft formal comments for the CRTC on behalf of independent artists and labels; design a user-friendly Android app with material design patterns and components, conduct ethnographic research to gather meaningful insights about a community, and establish a new in-house service design practice at a Fortune 500 government-sponsored enterprise (GSE). During my time at Capital One—and through the relationships I build with colleagues at Adaptive Path—I was fortunate to participate in training opportunities and workshops on visual storytelling, experience mapping, and service blueprinting. I've always been willing to learn and try new things, but I've come to realize that my most fulfilling work has involved having an impact on humanity, whether through interactions with my team or colleagues, our clients or customers, my friends and family, or people I meet throughout my life.

 
"Spread Kindness, Build Community" signs started appearing in our Del Ray neighborhood in Alexandria, Virginia shortly after the 2016 U.S. Election.

"Spread Kindness, Build Community" signs started appearing in our Del Ray neighborhood in Alexandria, Virginia shortly after the 2016 U.S. Election.

 

My path to a career in design has undoubtedly been circuitous, but the field has evolved to embrace a diverse range of education and experience, and I’m excited about our potential to make a difference in this world through design. Ultimately, I care about helping people and believe that design offers a set of methods and tools to help us create the change we wish to see in the world. Hopefully, this new—human-centered—way of thinking will enable us all to contribute to a more sustainable future for both people and the planet. Most recently, I've been delving into systems oriented service design, extending into organizational design and the employee experience.

Systemic design is distinguished from service or experience design in terms of scale, social complexity and integration – it is concerned with higher order systems that that entail multiple subsystems.  By integrating systems thinking and its methods, systemic design brings human-centered design to complex, multi-stakeholder service systems. It adapts from known design competencies – form and process reasoning, social and generative research methods, and sketching and visualization practices – to describe, map, propose and reconfigure complex services and systems.
— Systemic Design Research Network
People have an amazing ability to empathize, to be creative and collaborate toward a better future. We believe that organizations sit on a goldmine of suppressed employee engagement. And design can help unlock it.
— "Four principles for humanizing the future of work" — Veryday

In 2016, I started working toward a professional doctorate of design (DDes) in transition design at Carnegie Mellon University. Transition design recognizes the need for systems-level thinking and participatory design to effectively create solutions that will lead to more sustainable futures. Over the course of the next three years, I hope to deepen my understanding of positive psychology, organizational design, human resources, employee engagement and development; co-create new ways to understand, evaluate, and reward success; and generate resources for individuals, communities, and organizations to facilitate human-centered organizational change.

I currently lead the service design team at Fannie Mae in Washington, D.C. and am helping to establish their new in-house design capability. In addition to my work in design, I'm also really passionate about strengthening the connection between higher education and industry, and have been heavily involved in campus recruiting, mentoring and public speaking. One of these days, I will find time to start blogging...

 

Further reading, listening, and viewing

 
 
 

"Banking on Happiness" (revised for external audiences) delivered during People + Money at Carnegie Mellon University, February, 2016.

 
 

Professional bio

Jacquelyn is a tireless advocate of human needs and excels at bringing human-centered design solutions to complex, multi-stakeholder service systems. She currently leads the service design team at Fannie Mae in Washington, D.C. and is helping to establish their new in-house design capability.

Leveraging her education in critical theory, cultural policy, critical technology studies, and—at present—transition design, Jacquelyn approaches problem solving with a thoughtful and open mind to welcome new insights, ideas, and opportunities for collaboration with experts, stakeholders, and diverse research populations. Her professional background in cultural policy, technology, business development, and communications strategy also lends itself to her interest in the emerging field of systemic design

“Systemic design is distinguished from service or experience design in terms of scale, social complexity and integration – it is concerned with higher order systems that that entail multiple subsystems. By integrating systems thinking and its methods, systemic design brings human-centered design to complex, multi-stakeholder service systems. It adapts from known design competencies – form and process reasoning, social and generative research methods, and sketching and visualization practices – to describe, map, propose and reconfigure complex services and systems.” — Systemic Design Research Network

Jacquelyn has spent the past eight years working as an experience designer on digital projects for financial services, government contracting, music, film, broadcasting, higher education, and content marketing. Her early work includes brand identity design, responsive Web design, UI design for Web applications, and user research. More recently, she has been engaged in design thinking strategy, workshop facilitation, service design leadership, mobile app design for iOS and Android, the co-creation of a new design development program for entry-level designers, and measuring financial well-being. Jacquelyn has attended workshops on systemic design, visual storytelling, experience mapping, and service blueprinting to further her skills in service design, design strategy, and storytelling.

She is currently working on her Doctorate of Design (DDes) in Transition Design at Carnegie Mellon University. Transition design recognizes the need for systems-level thinking and participatory design to effectively create solutions that will lead to more sustainable futures. Over the course of the next few years, she hopes to deepen her understanding of positive psychology, organizational design, human resources, employee engagement and development; co-create new ways to understand, evaluate, and reward success; and generate resources for individuals, communities, and organizations to facilitate human-centered organizational change.

In addition to her work in design, Jacquelyn is also really passionate about strengthening the connection between higher education and industry, and has been heavily involved in campus recruiting, mentoring, and public speaking.

Jacquelyn graduated with an Honors B.A. in Communication Studies (Summa Cum Laude) from York University with a focus on cultural policy and critical technology studies, and a B.A. in English from the University of Guelph.